A contribution to Black History Month

With November fast approaching, I realise I’d better move fast if I want to mark Black History Month – although I would, of course, add something of interest at any time of the year!

Not only were the allied forces in Salonika diverse in terms of the participating nations, but there were also varied ethnicities to be found within national forces. France stands out with its troops from West and North Africa, Madagascar and Indochina, alongside those from metropolitan France.

Two French colonial soldiers, an Annamite (Vietnamese) and a Malagasy tirailleurs, at Zeitenlik in Salonika, July 1917. THE FRENCH ARMY IN THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918 Two French colonial soldiers, an Annamite (Vietnamese) and a Malagasy tirailleurs, at Zeitenlik in Salonika, July 1917. THE FRENCH ARMY IN THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918 (click on image to see full size) © IWM (Q 50375)


Convalescent French soldiers at the Scottish Women's Hospital near Salonika look at the Battle Honours inscribed on the drum of the 1st Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN 1915-1918 Convalescent French soldiers at the Scottish Women’s Hospital near Salonika look at the Battle Honours inscribed on the drum of the 1st Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN 1915-1918. Click on the image to see full size. © IWM (Q 32036)


Christmas postcard from 1916 - Christmas Greeting 1916 from the Salonica Army. Historic Group of Allied Comrades in Arms.

Author: scswebeditor

Robin Braysher joined the SCS in 2003 and from 2008 has been the Society's web editor. His interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Fred, who served as a cyclist with the BSF from 1915 to 1917, mainly in the Struma valley. Robin hands over the role in October 2021 to Andy Hutt. Andy's interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Arthur, who served as a Royal Engineer from 1916-1918. All posts prior to February 2021 are by Robin. Opinions expressed in these posts are personal and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society.

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