Faces of Salonika : John Henry Gibbon – Methodist army chaplain

The John Rylands Library recently accepted on deposit a collection of diaries written by a Methodist army chaplain John Henry Gibbon (1880-1933), who served in Salonika with the 67th Brigade of the 22nd Division between November 1916 and June 1917. Continue reading “Faces of Salonika : John Henry Gibbon – Methodist army chaplain”

‘For the Fallen’ : an exhibition at the King’s Own Museum, Lancaster

For the Fallen – Now That The War Is Over is a major exhibition at the King’s Own Royal Regiment Museum, Lancaster on the end of the war and its immediate aftermath.  The exhibition includes a Victoria Cross, never before on public display, and a manuscript copy of Laurence Binyon’s “For the Fallen”. It runs until 24 March 2019. Continue reading “‘For the Fallen’ : an exhibition at the King’s Own Museum, Lancaster”

“508 bottles of beer will be sent to you”

Early in the morning of September 18th this apparently inconsequential message was telephoned to each British Divisional HQ. It was the signal that the attack at Doiran was to be launched at eight minutes past five that morning, one and three-quarter hours before sunrise. The offensive opened with…

Continue reading ““508 bottles of beer will be sent to you””

Faces of Salonika : Frank Whitehead, 13/Manchesters

My thanks go to  Caroline Booth and Joseph Travis for sharing with us their fascinating and detailed blog – A Year of War – about their grandfather/great-grandfather, Frank Whitehead, who served in Salonika in 1918. Frank served with 13/Manchesters, which was in 22nd Division, 66th Brigade on the Doiran Front. Continue reading “Faces of Salonika : Frank Whitehead, 13/Manchesters”

Review : Daring All Things: The autobiography of George Kendall (1881-1961)

At the end of 2016 we announced the imminent publication of Daring All Things: The autobiography of George Kendall (1881-1961). George Kendall was a hugely experienced war chaplain who briefly served in Salonika with 22nd Division before succumbing to the inevitable malaria and dysentery. In the post-war years he was closely involved in the development of war cemeteries, which culminated in the process to select the body of the ‘Unknown Warrior’. This is a good opportunity to remind you that the book is for sale and to share with you this recent review from Church Times:

The book is published by Helion & Company Ltd and we can expect to hear more about it this year as we approach the centenary of the end of the conflict.