Don’t miss Alfred Munnings at the National Army Museum, London

If you can get to the National Army Museum in Chelsea before 3 March, then I heartily recommend the exhibition of First World war paintings by Sir Alfred Munnings, one of Britain’s most celebrated equine artists, who attended the Norwich Art School.

This exhibition features over 40 original paintings from his time with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1918. So nothing to do with the Salonika campaign, but well worth a visit nonetheless.

Displayed together for the first time in a century, these impressionist paintings cover equine subjects, portraiture and pastoral landscapes. Some are on loan from the Canadian War Museum, whilst others are from the National Army Museum’s own collection.

As an official war artist commissioned by the Canadian War Memorials Fund, Munnings provides an insight into the men (and horses) of the Canadian Cavalry Brigade and the Canadian Forestry Corps. Munnings’ wartime artwork was pivotal in establishing his success and securing his admittance to the Royal Academy of Arts in 1919.

Read more online here or watch a video on YouTube.

My only disappointment is that no  mules are depicted so, to make up for that omission …

An Indian muleteer having trouble with his team of pack mules, Salonika, 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918 An Indian muleteer having trouble with his team of pack mules, Salonika, 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918 (click on image to see full size) © IWM (Q 31671)

Author: scswebeditor

Robin Braysher joined the SCS in 2003 and from 2008 has been the Society's web editor. His interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Fred, who served as a cyclist with the BSF from 1915 to 1917, mainly in the Struma valley. Robin hands over the role in October 2021 to Andy Hutt. Andy's interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Arthur, who served as a Royal Engineer from 1916-1918. All posts prior to February 2021 are by Robin. Opinions expressed in these posts are personal and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society.

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