Faces of Salonika : Private William Gould, 1/Welsh

My thanks go to David and Samantha George for kindly sharing with us a splendid photograph of their relative, William Gould.

Private William Gould served with 1/Welsh (84th Infantry Brigade, 28th Division) in the Struma Valley, where he was killed in action on 28 February 1917. He is buried in the Struma Military Cemetery. Two other men from 1/Welsh were killed on the same day, perhaps in the same incident (shell-fire, an ambush on patrol …? ): 9596 L/Cpl T. Williams and 50081 Private Frank Gore. William was 25 and Frank 28; L/Cpl Williams’ age is not recorded.

It is hoped that the Battalion War Diary will give details of the incident(s) that caused their deaths. Unfortunately those for Macedonia have not been digitised so a visit to the National Archives at Kew is necessary, although it is likely that the Regimental Museum at Brecon will have a copy so David – who lives in Canada – will be contacting them. If, however, you can shed any light on what happened to 1/Welsh on 28 February 1917, please let us know.

Photograph of 18855 Private William Thomas Gould, 1/Welsh, killed in action on 28 February 1917 and buried in the Struma Military Cemetery.
18855 Private William Thomas Gould, 1/Welsh, killed in action on 28 February 1917; buried in the Struma Military Cemetery.

William, a native of Pontycymmer, Bridgend was the son of Annie Pugh (formerly Gould), of Cot Cefn, Cribbwr, Bridgend, Glamorgan and the late Thomas Gould. He enlisted October 1914.


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Author: scswebeditor

Robin Braysher joined the SCS in 2003 and from 2008 has been the Society's web editor. His interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Fred, who served as a cyclist with the BSF from 1915 to 1917, mainly in the Struma valley. Robin hands over the role in October 2021 to Andy Hutt. Andy's interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Arthur, who served as a Royal Engineer from 1916-1918. All posts prior to February 2021 are by Robin. Opinions expressed in these posts are personal and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society.

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