First Battle of Doiran : unwelcome intelligence

From Alan Palmer’s The Gardeners of Salonika, published in 1965 by Andre Deutsch Limited, London (p. 119):

On the morning of April 24th [1917], with only twelve hours to go before the attack, disturbing news reached Yanesh [also known as Janes, now Metallikon; HQ of Lt-Gen. Sir Henry Maitland Wilson, commander of XII Corps]. A prisoner had been brought in by a wire-cutting patrol in the small hours and had volunteered the information that the Bulgars had received reinforcements and, what was more serious, that his regiment had been told to stand on the alert that evening at eight as a British attack was expected after dusk. General Wilson hurried off to consult Milne, who had driven up to Yanesh to await the battle : should the plan be changed? Milne thought not : there had never been much chance of surprise; but it was, none the less, disturbing to find that the enemy was expecting an attack at night rather than at dawn.

Lieutenant General Sir Henry Fuller Maitland Wilson, G.O.C. XII Corps, attending a Gymkhana arranged by two Scottish Battalions, Salonika, 12 February 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918
Lieutenant General Sir Henry Fuller Maitland Wilson, G.O.C. XII Corps, attending a Gymkhana arranged by two Scottish Battalions, Salonika, 12 February 1916. THE MACEDONIAN CAMPAIGN, 1915-1918 © IWM (Q 31732)


Find out more

Author: scswebeditor

Robin Braysher joined the SCS in 2003 and from 2008 has been the Society's web editor. His interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Fred, who served as a cyclist with the BSF from 1915 to 1917, mainly in the Struma valley. Robin hands over the role in October 2021 to Andy Hutt. Andy's interest in the campaign comes from his grandfather, Arthur, who served as a Royal Engineer from 1916-1918. All posts prior to February 2021 are by Robin. Opinions expressed in these posts are personal and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Society.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.